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  • Axis Capital to exit coal, oil sands insurance business

    first_imgAxis Capital to exit coal, oil sands insurance business FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Canadian Underwriter:Starting next year, Axis Capital Holdings Ltd. will stop writing new insurance and facultative reinsurance for oil sands extraction and pipeline projects.Pembroke, Bermuda-based Axis writes commercial specialty and reinsurance. Its new thermal coal and oil sands underwriting and investment policy takes effect Jan. 1, Axis Capital said Wednesday in a release.“AXIS will not provide new insurance or facultative reinsurance for the construction of new thermal coal plants or mines and their dedicated infrastructure or oil sands extraction and pipeline projects and their dedicated infrastructure; or to companies that generate 30% or more of their revenues from thermal coal mining, generate 30% or more of their power from thermal coal, or hold more than 20% of their reserves in oil sands,” the insurer said. “Renewals will be considered on a case-by-case basis until Jan. 1, 2023. Exceptions to this policy may be considered on a limited basis until Jan. 1, 2025 in countries where sufficient access to alternative energy sources is not available.”The announcement comes less than a week after Canadian Underwriter obtained a memo that purports to be a “CrossLine Alert,” issued for internal users only, from Munich Re. In that memo – which Munich Re has neither confirmed nor denied to be authentic – the insurer says facultative reinsurance covers and primary insurance business, including renewals, will no longer be signed for the planning, financing, construction of new oil sand sites. “We believe insurers have an important role to play in mitigating climate risk and transitioning to a low-carbon economy,” Axis Capital CEO Albert Benmichol stated Wednesday in a release.As a result of global warming, Canada will have more frequent heat waves, droughts and precipitation events, Insurance Bureau of Canada CEO Don Forgeron said Apr. 25 at IBC’s annual general meeting.More: Another insurer to withdraw coverage from oil sandslast_img read more

  • Estwick warns Windies to prepare to ‘fight and scrap’

    first_imgMANCHESTER, England, (CMC) – Assistant coach Roddy Estwick said Monday West Indies had put last year’s Wisden Trophy triumph behind them and were cognisant of the new challenges which lay before them when they faced England in next month’s three-Test series.The Caribbean side thrashed England on home soil to claim their first series win in a decade but Estwick said with England in home conditions, and with the tour overshadowed by COVID-19 playing protocols, West Indies were facing a “very difficult series”.Stressing the need for thorough preparation and discipline, Estwick said West Indies had to be prepared to “fight and scrap”, if they were to successfully defend the Wisden.“It (last year’s series win) should give us some confidence but remember we won the Wisden Trophy back in the West Indies,” Estwick cautioned.“We’re in England now where England are very, very strong and where they very seldom lose Test series, so we’ve got to be up and running, we’ve got to be well prepared – that’s the key thing.“We can’t become complacent thinking we’ve won the series in the West Indies. It’s a new series, it’s completely different now, it’s being played behind closed doors, there are no spectators so there are a lot of changes since we last played in the Caribbean so we’ve got to be ready.”He continued: “We’ve got to make sure that our preparation is spot on, our discipline is spot on and we cannot underestimate the English. They’ll be hardworking, we’ve got to be disciplined.“They’re under a new coach, they’ve come off a good series win in South Africa so they will be ready and we’ve got to be ready to match them stride for stride and be prepared to fight and scrap because this is going to be a very, very difficult series and we know that and we’ve got to be well prepared. “The key thing is how well we prepare and then trust the process, and go and execute properly.”West Indies will be also fighting the weight of history, having not won a series in England in 32 years. In their last series here three years ago, they produced a remarkable win at Leeds to level the three-match rubber but then lost heavily at Lord’s.Estwick, who was part of the coaching unit for the 2017 series here, said the Headingley victory had proven West Indies had the ability to compete with the best Test sides.“If you remember we got beaten badly at Edgbaston and we regrouped and had a famous win at Headingley,” the Barbadian recalled.“What that tells us is that we can compete and if you look over the two series. For me, you would say the series is three-all right now – England won two Test matches over here in 2017 and we won one; we won two in the Caribbean and they won one so the series for us is all square.“We need now to win this series just to get ahead because we won on home soil, they won on home soil so it’s all up for grabs so we’ve got to make sure we find that extra motivation and if we find that extra motivation, then we can spring a surprise.”West Indies arrived here last Tuesday for the historic tour which will take place in a bio-secure environment amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.They are currently training while under quarantine at Old Trafford here and will remain isolated from the public for the duration of the seven-week tour, which will see Tests at the Ageas Bowl in Southampton and at the storied venue here.Estwick said the most important part of the preparation now was practice matches, especially with players coming out of lockdown situations in the Caribbean and unable to get match practice under their belts.“I don’t think motivation is a problem. I think once we can get them up to speed, that’s going to be the most difficult thing,” he pointed out.“Obviously they were in lockdown for two months but we (Barbadian contingent) were fortunate enough in the last two weeks in Barbados before we came over, we were able to get some work done. “The weather has been kind to us here since we arrived in England so we’ve had five days of practice so we’re getting there – we’re not fully there.“We had a meeting last night to discuss how people are feeling in their body and how ready they think they are. Most people think they are about 80 per cent at the moment so we just need to keep building up and the key thing for us is to arrive in the first Test fully ready.”He added: “We’ve got three practice matches and once people can get some more miles in their legs because as you know match practice is very, very important. You can prepare all you want in the nets but you need to go in and try and get some match readiness so once we can get match hardened then we should be fine.”last_img read more

  • Dodgers’ bats boom again with homers from Joc Pederson, Yasiel Puig and Max Muncy

    first_imgPreviousLOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts as he is picked off third base to end the third inning against the Texas Rangers at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Los Angeles starting pitcher Caleb Ferguson throws against the Texas Rangers during the first inning of a baseball game, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles starting pitcher Caleb Ferguson throws to a Texas Rangers batter during the first inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Texas Rangers starting pitcher Bartolo Colon throws to a Los Angeles Dodgers batter during the first inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig swings for an RBI double during the second inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Fans watch as Texas Rangers’ Delino DeShields misses an RBI double hit by Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig during the second inning of a baseball game, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Texas Rangers’ Delino DeShields can’t catch a double hit by Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig during the second inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Texas Rangers’ Joey Gallo, right, chases a double hit by Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig as Delino DeShields tumbles after missing the ball during the second inning of a baseball game, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts to his RBI double to take a 1-0 lead over the Texas Rangers during the second inning at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers watches his two run homerun to take a 3-0 lead over the Texas Rangers during the second inning at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Joc Pederson hits a two-run home run during the second inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Joc Pederson watches his two-run home run during the second inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts to his two run homerun to take a 3-0 lead over the Texas Rangers during the second inning at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Joc Pederson celebrates his two-run home run during the second inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers celebrates his two run homerun with Yasiel Puig #66 to take a 3-0 lead over the Texas Rangers during the second inning at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Texas Rangers starting pitcher Bartolo Colon walks through the dugout before the team’s baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Texas Rangers’ Shin-Soo Choo, of South Korea, is greeted by teammates after he scored on a single by Adrian Beltre against the Los Angeles Dodgers during the third inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles starting pitcher Caleb Ferguson wipes his face after walking Texas Rangers’ Robinson Chirinos during the second inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Caleb Ferguson #64 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after allowing his second walk of the second inning against the Texas Rangers at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Texas Rangers starting pitcher Bartolo Colon throws to a Los Angeles Dodgers batter during the first inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Max Muncy #13 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts to his strikeout during the first inning against the Texas Rangers at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Texas Rangers starting pitcher Bartolo Colon tosses the new ball after giving up a home run to Los Angeles Dodgers’ Max Muncy, background right, during the third inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Texas Rangers starting pitcher Bartolo Colon tosses the ball after giving up an RBI single to Los Angeles Dodgers’ Chris Taylor during the fourth inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Max Muncy, left, celebrates his home run with Matt Kemp during the third inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Flanked by Texas Rangers catcher Robinson Chirinos, second from left, and Ronald Guzman, starting pitcher Bartolo Colon, center, hands the ball to manager Jeff Banister during the fourth inning of the team’s baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts to his two run homerun to take a 6-2 lead over the Texas Rangers during the fourth inning at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig celebrates his two-run home run during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Matt Kemp, left, and Cody Bellinger shake hands after they scored on a single by Yasmani Grandal during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Cody Bellinger #35 and Matt Kemp #27 celebrate their runs from a Yasmani Grandal #9 single, in front of Robinson Chirinos #61 of the Texas Rangers, to take a 11-2 lead over the Texas Rangers during the fourth inning at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Cody Bellinger #35 and Matt Kemp #27 celebrate their runs from a Yasmani Grandal #9 single to take a 11-2 lead over the Texas Rangers during the fourth inning at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Yimi Garcia #63 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches in relief during the fifth inning against the Texas Rangers at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Yimi Garcia #63 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts after allowing a solo homerun to Shin-Soo Choo #17 of the Texas Rangers during the fifth inning against the Texas Rangers at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Daniel Corcino #56 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts to his pitch during a 12-5 win over the Texas Rangers at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Daniel Corcino #56 of the Los Angeles Dodgers celebrates a 12-5 win over the Texas Rangers with Yasmani Grandal #9 at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)The Dodgers’ Chris Taylor, left, and Joc Pederson celebrate their team’s 12-5 victory over the Texas Rangers on Tuesday night at Dodger Stadium. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts as he is picked off third base to end the third inning against the Texas Rangers at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 35LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 12: Justin Turner #10 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts as he is picked off third base to end the third inning against the Texas Rangers at Dodger Stadium on June 12, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)ExpandLOS ANGELES — Respect your elders. But hammer his fastball.The Dodgers found the senior slinging of 45-year-old Bartolo Colon to their liking, pounding him for eight runs on nine hits, including three more home runs, in the first four innings of a 12-5 victory over the Texas Rangers on Tuesday night.The win was the Dodgers’ eighth in their last 10 games – a stretch during which they have identified their starting pitcher each day like game shows call contestants out of the audience – and 18 of their past 24.“That ‘hitting-is-contagious’ thing is real,” said Dodgers first baseman Cody Bellinger, who was on base four times including an RBI double in a seven-run fourth inning. “We have a really deep lineup. I wouldn’t want to face us. Dodgers’ Justin Turner looking rejuvenated on defense Dodgers bench slumping Cody Bellinger for a day It is. But no one expected it to play out with Muncy leading the team in home runs. But his second-inning solo launch off Colon was his team-high 13th – despite not joining the major-league club until mid-April and bringing with him a major-league resume’ that included all of five home runs in 215 previous big-league at-bats.“A grinder, a guy who is all in and will do whatever it takes for us to win,” Roberts said of his expectations when Muncy arrived from Triple-A on April 17. “I didn’t expect to see the consistent slug and the ability to barrel baseballs. This guy, he knows where the barrel’s at.“I just didn’t appreciate it. I didn’t know the player. In spring training, obviously it was a small sample. But the more you see him … there’s a lot to like.”Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.There’s a lot to see of Colon, too and he has become the Don Quixote, assaulting the windmills of age – and fitness – in the image of a beer-guzzling fan who somehow found his way onto the field. Tuesday, he was matched against an opposing starting pitcher who was nine months old when Colon made his major-league debut. In the home dugout, the manger was a teammate from another century.Colon has remarkably held back the hands of time, throwing his fastball 80 percent of the time even though it has lost 5 mph since he and Roberts were Cleveland Indians together. But these Dodgers feast on fastballs the way Colon … well, appears to have feasted on a lot of things over the years.They put up three runs in the second inning on a walk to Bellinger, a two-out double just short of clearing the fence by Puig and a two-run home run by Pederson.Related Articles For Pederson, it was one of seven home runs in his last 26 plate appearances after he hit just one home run in his first 151 trips to the plate this season.The Dodgers put the game away with a seven-run fourth inning that included a two-run home run by Puig – who had no home runs in his first 100 at-bats this season but now has eight in his last 77 at-bats. Yasmani Grandal drove in two runs with a single, Bellinger one with his double.The smoke billowing from the Rangers’ team ERA provided cover for Ferguson, who looked at least somewhat more at ease in his second big-league start. Ferguson lasted only 1-2/3 innings in his debut last week. This time, he was only asked to go four and did that ably enough before Roberts let the bullpen coast to the finish.“Caleb was better today,” Roberts said, non-committal when asked if Ferguson will remain in the Dodgers’ needy rotation. “I think with Caleb – he’s still green. He’s still learning the league and learning himself.“It’s in there. Caleb can pitch. He competes really well.” Dodgers’ Dave Roberts says baseball’s unwritten rules ‘have changed, should change’ center_img Whicker: Dustin May yet another example of the Dodgers’ eye for pitching Dodgers’ hot-hitting Corey Seager leaves game with back injury “I think winning is contagious too. We finally got that monkey off our back.”That monkey was sitting comfortably when the Dodgers bottomed out 10 games under .500 (16-26) in mid-May. Since then, they have outhomered their opponents 46-19 and experienced a real June boom. The Dodgers lead all of MLB this month in nearly every offensive category, including runs scored (84 in 10 games) and home runs (29).Joc Pederson, Max Muncy and Yasiel Puig each homered in Tuesday’s win. Pederson (7) and Muncy (6) lead MLB in home runs this month.“It’s hard to explain homers. But, gosh, you see what Joc’s done this month, Max has done essentially all year,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “I think obviously they’re elevating the baseball, squaring it up, taking good swings, having good at-bats. I think across the board. Even the ability to use the opposite-field gap, take a walk, hit a line drive – I just think we’re taking a lot of good swings, grinding at-bats.“We’re built sort of on slugging, guys who can take the walk, identify strike from ball and it’s kind of playing out that way right now.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

  • Lakers’ Brandon Ingram hopeful NBA rookie transition program will help him maximize potential

    first_imgThere, Ingram consulted with former NBA players Cliff Robinson and Derrick Hamilton, both of whom already mentored Ingram during previous summer camps. Ingram listened to former Lakers center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar provide perspective on both learning and mastering fundamentals, two skills that ensured a 20-year NBA career, six NBA championships and first place on the league’s all-time scoring list. “I have to listen to the vets and gain knowledge,” Ingram said. “I have to surround myself with the right people.”Ingram already has. He grew up in Kinston, North Carolina, relying on various mentors. His father, Donald, ran a local rec center and taught his son how to play basketball at an early age. Former NBA player Jerry Stackhouse, who also attended Kinston High, coached him on an AAU team. Ingram’s 25-year-old brother, Bo, who played at the University of Texas at Arlington, also plans to live with Brandon in Los Angeles during his freshman season.“He’s here for a job,” Ingram said of his brother. “Just to keep me in the right spots and make sure I’m somewhere on time. He’s there to give me tough love, constructive criticism and help me with my game.”The two also have to find a place to live in Los Angeles, which hasn’t happened yet because of Ingram’s higher priority on offseason training. After practicing with the U.S. Select team in Las Vegas in mid July, Ingram estimated he rested for only two or three days afterward. Then, Ingram resumed training in Kinston, which has included adding muscle to his listed 6-foot-9, 190-pound frame, maintaining his conditioning and sharpening his shooting. He plans to return to Los Angeles sometime next week both to finalize living arrangements and to train at the Lakers’ practice facility in El Segundo. “Just trying to make it the best season I can and develop mental toughness,” Ingram said. “I know there’s going to be bumps in the road. There’s a lot of guys out here that are going to want to beat me up. There are a lot of veterans out here. I just have to fight through it and be the best player I can be on the court.” And perhaps apply some of the lessons learned during the rookie transition program. “It helps. But of course, you never know what to expect coming into the next level,” Ingram said. “It’s a lot of information to take in. We’re not going to learn it all right now. But it’s very important to talk to guys who have been here before in this league.” Editor’s Note: This story has been revised to correct the title of Purvis Short. The information seemed like an in-depth scouting report. This time, the material did not involve how Lakers rookie forward Brandon Ingram can add muscle to his rail-thin frame. Nor did it address how Ingram can improve the inconsistent shooting percentages he posted in Summer League play.Instead, Ingram attended the NBA’s Rookie Transition Program from Aug. 8-11, a workshop the league and players union set up that included guest speakers, panel discussions and group breakout sessions. In what marked the 30th anniversary of the program’s existence, a record 80 NBA rookies learned various issues, including how to properly handle finances, achieve NBA longevity and avoid off-court distractions. All of which could determine whether Ingram achieves his goal of winning the NBA’s Rookie of the Year award in the 2016-17 season as the Lakers’ No. 2 pick. “That’s something that is on my mind,” Ingram said in a phone interview with Southern California News Group. “All rookies want to win Rookie of the Year. That’s something that drives me.” The Lakers have found Ingram driven to maximize his potential as an outside shooter and wing defender after winning the ACC’s Freshman of the Year award during his lone season at Duke. Even if Ingram posted 12.2 points on only 41.2 percent shooting in summer league play, the Lakers also became encouraged with his hustle and willingness not to back down from physical play. Even if Ingram sounded ambitious about wanting to “make an impact right away,” he sounded more tempered about to what degree the Lakers will. After all, the Lakers went 17-65 last season in what marked their worst record in franchise history. Lakers head coach Luke Walton and his players appear promising albeit inexperienced. “We know we’re not going to go out and win 50 games this year and develop that chemistry right away,” Ingram said. “We know it’s a process. We have a new coach. We’ll have to continue to work hard each and every day. Hard work, developing chemistry, having good teammates and a good locker room, I think that’s what a successful season is.” Ingram’s participation in the league’s rookie transition program illustrated his intent to minimize any hiccups. NBA senior vice president of player development Greg Taylor described the 18-year-old Ingram as a “mature, young man” who became “highly engaged” during the various classes. “Here’s a kid that really wants to excel,” said Purvis Short, NBAPA’s Director of Player Program. “He understands in order to do that, you have to humble yourself. He realizes that he doesn’t know everything. He was very open to all the information. I was very impressed.” center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

  • Top stories Earths darkest year errors in ocean study and a young

    first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Why 536 was ‘the worst year to be alive’After analyzing volcanic glass particles in ice from a Swiss glacier, a team of researchers has identified why some medieval historians say 536 was the worst year to be alive. Early that year, a cataclysmic volcano in Iceland spewed ash across the Northern Hemisphere, creating a fog that plunged Europe, the Middle East, and parts of Asia into darkness—day and night—for 18 months. Summer temperatures dropped 1.5°C to 2.5°C, initiating the coldest decade in the past 2300 years.High-profile ocean warming paper to get a correction Email By Frankie SchembriNov. 16, 2018 , 3:40 PM (left to right): NICOLE SPAULDING/CCI FROM C. P. LOVELUCK ET AL., ANTIQUITY 10.15184, 4, 2018; DANIEL RAMIREZ/FLICKR; NASA SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION STUDIO Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Top stories: Earth’s darkest year, errors in ocean study, and a young crater under Greenland’s ice Scientists behind a major study on ocean warming this month are acknowledging errors in their calculations and say conclusions are not as certain as first reported. The research, published in Nature, said oceans are warming much faster than previously estimated. After a blog post flagged some discrepancies in the study, the authors said they would submit a correction to the journal.Massive crater under Greenland’s ice points to climate-altering impact in the time of humansAn international team of scientists this week reported the discovery of a 31-kilometer-wide impact crater hidden beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet, left after a 1.5-kilometer-wide asteroid slammed into Earth. One of the planet’s 25 largest-known craters, it is also remarkably fresh, seemingly indicating a recent strike within the last few million years. The timing is still up for debate, but some researchers on the discovery team believe the asteroid struck at a crucial moment: roughly 13,000 years ago, just as the world was thawing from the last ice age.Do gut bacteria make a second home in our brains?At the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in San Diego, California, last week, neuroanatomist Rosalinda Roberts made a splash with a presentation of results from her lab at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, in which bacteria was spotted inhabiting the cells of healthy human brains harvested from cadavers. Roberts was careful to note her team hasn’t ruled out the possibility of sample contamination, but the results are one of several preliminary indications that bacteria could directly influence processes in the brain.Large, strangely dim galaxy found lurking on far side of Milky WayAstronomers have discovered a dwarf galaxy, called Antlia 2, that is one-third the size of the Milky Way itself lurking on the far side of our galaxy. As big as the Large Magellanic Cloud, the galaxy’s largest companion, Antlia 2 eluded detection until now because it is 10,000 times fainter. Such a strange beast challenges models of galaxy formation and dark matter, the unseen stuff that helps pull galaxies together.last_img read more

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